Horsham St Faith is that most quintessential of English villages

Thought to have been settled in early Saxon times, the village takes its name from the River Hor, which runs through it on its way from Horsford to Horstead; and a Benedictine priory, founded in honour of the French Saint Faith.

Horsham St Faith is that most quintessential of English villages. No, not a sterile picture-postcard setting of manicured cottages; it's the real thing - displaying a genuine Norfolk character with deep roots. Thought to have been settled in early Saxon times, the village takes its name from the River Hor, which runs through it on its way from Horsford to Horstead and a Benedictine priory, founded in honour of the French Saint Faith. The village has seen a succession of Lords sitting in the manor house, which was converted from the old priory. The monks' refectory still remains, and contains its original 13th century wall painting the only one of its type in England.

The parish church of St Mary and St Andrew is a Grade 1-listed building that includes some fascinating features. The west tower dates back to 1290 and was restored in 1873. Of the church's six bells, four are original. Horsham St Faith also saw action in WW2, when Spitfires of No. 19 and No. 66 Squadrons, as well as aircraft from other squadrons (including the USAF), were flown from the base - now Norwich International Airport. Notably, an aircraft from No. 18 Squadron RAF flew from the base to St. Omer-Longeunesse to drop a box containing a pair of legs for Wing Commander Douglas Bader, who had been shot down over France and lost his artificial limbs in the process.

The village is only a 15-minute drive from Wroxham, handy for Norfolk's famous Broads and is just 15 minutes' drive to the centre of Norwich. But even though it's so close to such a major city, it remains an unspoiled, utterly charming piece of the Norfolk countryside. We hope you enjoy your visit.